Articles tagged with: CLTV EFRT

This is Your Brain on Music

Written By Jake Goble on Friday, 05 August 2011

 

So there you are, immersed in the enveloping sound of music. Perhaps you find yourself in your car, speeding down the highway with the window rolled down. Or you’re at a concert, surrounded by a score of dancing bodies and flashing LED panels overhead. Or maybe you’re just at home, laid back in the couch feeling high on life and whatever else. Then it hits you; the rush of countless serotonins in your brain followed by joy, amazement, and goose bumps on your skin. We can often perceive such an internal sensation when the beat drops, the lead singer hits a high note, a guitarist shreds a spectacular solo, or there is a seemingly perfect harmonic fusion of instruments. Could there be a meaning behind all of this?

Indeed there is. Believe it or not, there have been amazing discoveries concerning the relationship between the human mind and music. No doubt, many people can already sense this connection, especially creators of music themselves. By better understanding this link, one can use it to their advantage when writing music, syncing media with music, or performing it live.

My first year in college I was given a book as a gift called “This is your Brain on Music” by Daniel J. Levitin. Although it may sound similar to an anti-drug commercial where a young woman smashes everything in her kitchen with a frying pan, it is thankfully not. Instead, the book opens a door into a young area of psychology supported by many relevant examples in popular music. While reading through my paperback version I, felt as if I was becoming more conscious of another sense I have towards anything musical. It could best be described as a direct insight into a magical byproduct of human existence.

 

Music is organized sound, but the organization has to involve some element of the unexpected or it is emotionally flat and robotic. The appreciation we have for music is intimately related to our ability to learn the underlying structure of music we like--the equivalent to grammar in spoken or signed languages--and to be able to make predictions about what will come next. Composers imbue music with emotion by knowing what our expectations are and then very deliberately controlling when those expectations will be met, and when they won't. The thrills, chills, and tears we experience from music are the result of having our expectations artfully manipulated by a skilled composer and the musicians who interpret that music.

 

- DANIEL J. LEVITIN, This Is Your Brain on Music

 

For any producer, dj, songwriter, singer, player of any instrument, or anyone just interested in the logistics of music, this book is a must read. If you’ve taken any Introduction to Psychology or Music Theory class in college, then you’ll be familiar with much of the terminology. However if you have not, much of the diction in the book is concisely defined right off the bat. Make sure to check this paper enlightenment out from your nearest library if you get a chance. Feel free to email me at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with any comments.

 

Thanks for reading,



-Jake


Madeon Voyage

Written By Johnny Kenny on Monday, 01 August 2011

 

I came across Madeon’s “Pop-Culture” (live mashup) while I was browsing the web a few weeks ago… I was captivated! I have heard all the hype about this kid, but seeing Madeon live at work proves his genius!

Madeon is self-described as an “electro-pop-house-whatever producer from France”. At the age of just 16 he achieved creditable recognition by becoming a joint-winner of Pendulum’s “The Island” remix competition, and also being praised by the likes of Skrillex and Pendulum front-man Rob Swire. His latest song a remix of deadmau5’ “Raise Your Weapons” was praised by Deadmau5 himself on facebook and other social utilities, Madeon’s Remix is also appeared on Deadmau5’s latest EP featuring a number of “Raise Your Weapon” remixes.

I look forward to seeing what Madeon has in store for us in the years to come! 

Limit Your Music, Limit Your Life

Written By Jake Goble on Friday, 29 July 2011

 

This morning was like any other Friday summer morning; I woke up, turned off my alarm, and generously granted myself another half an hour of sleep. When I awoke again, I casually got up and prepared a quick breakfast, consisting of toasted slices of banana (try this), my mom’s homemade raspberry jam, and some almond butter. I then, nestled it all together inside a piece of toast to make the perfect breakfast taco.

As I enjoyed this delicious treat, my thoughts returned to an idea that had been resurfacing in my mind lately. This summer, more so then ever, I have been continuously on the prowl for new music with no particular flavor in mind, just new, enjoyable, original music. As a result, I have found myself venturing into uncharted territory in a multitude of avenues in life. Additionally, I have felt the constant tingle of creativity on my tongue for poetry, in my eyes to draw, and in my fingers to play. The inspiration that I have embodied as of late has stemmed from a single source: new music. Now, I’m not trying to say I have discovered a hidden truth, but more so come to a realization of the profound affect of this fresh fruit of music on my life.

In order for progress to occur in any walk of life, the world requires you to step outside of your box, be creative, and engage yourself. In every ancient tribe of humans, every successful civilization, and most every culture, music is present. Music is biologically programmed into our bodies. Some may feel it more than others or apply it in different ways, but for the vast majority of the world, even if we don’t actually hear it with our ears, music is in our thoughts on a daily basis. I believe that it is that specific music, the music we replay, reinvent, or create in our minds that is the most essential in life. 



Wherever the source of this music derives from is up to you. However, if you are the type of person who relies on top 40 radio or MTV to find your music (not that there is anything wrong with that) you are in a sense limiting your own possibilities for inspiration and self-development. What is popular in the height of the mainstream media may appeal to you, but it could also hamper your own taste for music and thus the chance for creative stimulation. This is no doubt the case for everyone, but if music is the cornerstone for original and motivating thought within yourself, why not harness it to your full ability? 



You have nothing to lose. 



Now, take it or leave it as a suggestion or advice, but here are some methods I have found to be successful in my quest for new and inspiring music:


1. Go to a local coffee shop, bar, or community gathering with live music.


2. Go to a music festival with friends with bands you both have and have never heard before.


3. Look up music on the Internet (the fastest way) – websites I recommend:


  • Blip.fm
  • Grooveshark.com
  • Soundcloud.com

  • Remixartistcollective.com

  • Pandora.com

  • Spotify.com

  • Daytrotter.com

  • Prettylightsmusic.com

  • Reddit.com/r/music

  • Beatport.com

  • Thefreakbeat.com
  • hypem.com


4. Share it all. Once your friends learn to dig for music then they can share whatever they find with you and provide you with even more music than you have the time to look for yourself. I owe the knowledge of such paths to music to all of my friends, the venues I have visited that hold music, and the actions of web users on social networking and blogs for music. I appreciate your time reading my first rant for Collective Ink. Hopefully it has enlightened you in some way. Feel free to email me at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  with any comments, suggestions, or questions.


Happy hunting!

-Jake  

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